Monthly Archives: October 2008

A shoutout to the guy running a Sun box…

I took a look at my Google Analytics page tonight to check to see if anyone has been looking at any of the websites that I manage. I also use the same tool to watch my blogs. When I checked my “Fedora” blog I found some very interesting information. First, being that this is a Linux blog, I find it interesting that more people visit my website using Windows (XP if you care)! How crazy is that? Oh, and to the people that are still using Windows 98… it’s time to upgrade. The second biggest group were us Linux users followed by the Mac users, an iPhone, and one person on Sun.

Just something interesting I thought I’d pass along.

Scary…

I’m sitting here in my cube, confused. I just got cleared to install Linux on my work laptop in a dual-boot configuration… Now I’d like to figure out how to use all the open source tools to do my job without having to use Windoze. I think the smart card reader might be an issue. Anyone got that working?

Clarification: I’m talking about using smart cards that hold PKI keys not SD cards for cameras.

Shortwave Log for 16 Oct 2008

16:00 21,470 kHz – BBC Africa Service – Excellent signal.  SF:71 A:7 K:1.  TX from Ascension
17:00 13,675 kHz – BBC World Service – Good signal.  SF:71 A:7 K:1  Unknown from where it is being transmitted.
18:00 13,675 kHz – BBC World Service – Excellent signal.  SF:71 A:7 K:1.  Unknown from where it is being transmitted.
19:40 15,400 kHz – BBC World Service – Good signal.  SF:71 A:7 K:1
19:40 9,080 kHz – VOA Special English – Excellent signal.  TX from South Africa
19:41 15,410 kHz – VOA Special English – Good signal.  TX from Greenville, NC
19:46 15,580 kHz – VOA Special English – Good signal.  TX from Botswana
19:46 17,895 kHz – VOA Special English – Good signal.  TX from Greenville, NC

HF Allocations: Shortwave Broadcast v. Amateur Radio

I was just curious what percentage of the HF band is being used for Shortwave Broadcast versus Amateur Radio. Here’s what I came up with:
Shortwave: 6.145 MHz [1] or 22% of the HF band [2].

Start End Bandwidth
25.670 26.100 0.43
21.450 21.850 0.4
18.900 19.020 0.12
17.480 17.900 0.42
15.000 15.825 0.825
13.570 13.870 0.3
11.500 12.160 0.66
9.250 9.995 0.745
7.100 7.600 0.5
5.800 6.300 0.5
4.400 5.100 0.7
3.900 4.050 0.15
3.200 3.400 0.2
2.300 2.495 0.195

The 41m shortwave band is being changed. The 75m shortwave band is not used in all Regions and is shared with amateur radio.
Amateur radio: 3.75 MHz [3] or 13% of the HF band [4].

Start End Bandwidth
28.000 29.700 1.7
24.890 24.990 0.1
21.000 21.450 0.45
18.068 18.168 0.1
14.000 14.350 0.35
10.100 10.150 0.05
7.000 7.300 0.3
3.500 4.000 0.5
1.800 2.000 0.2

The 80m amateur radio band is not used in all Regions and is shared with amateur radio. Also, the 60m frequencies available to US and UK amateur radio operators are not included.

I wonder what the other ~78% of the HF band is being used for.

—-
[1] Includes 0.195 MHz in the medium wave band.
[2] Does not include 0.195 MHz in the medium wave band.
[3] Includes 0.2 MHz in the medium wave band.
[4] Does not include 0.2 MHz in the medium wave band.