Monthly Archives: April 2010

Geocaching and Linux

Ever since I switched to using Linux, completely, the one thing that I haven’t been able to fully integrate into my computing environment is my Geocaching hobby.  This is unfortunate because there is a lot of data involved in Geocaching and I’ve always wanted to be completely paperless.

My last attempt at doing paperless caching was using a BlackBerry as my data device.  Unfortunately I found the real-time connectivity to be spotty in areas and the interface to be slow and clunky.

I’m sure there are other solutions out there that are better than the option I once tried but I think I’ve found one that will make it a little easier, albeit not completely portable.

If you Google “Geocaching Linux” the first link that comes up (at least when I did my search) is that of “Rick Richardson’s Linux tools for geocaching“.  The tools that he has put together aren’t put together with a pretty GUI front-end but are instead very powerful command-line tools that allow you to do almost anything with the data that flows from Geocaching.com website.

The one tool I was looking for, myself, was the gpx2html tool.  This tool allows you to take a gpx file, like a pocket query from Geocaching.com, and turn it into a HTML file that contains all the information on the cache you seek.

There are several other tools that you can use for solving puzzles (or making them) or getting different forms of information from the Geocaching.com website.

I’m not sure what kind of GPS-interface these programs handle but I’ve been using gpsman for a while now which allows me to just drop the GPX file directly into my GPS.

Are there any other Geocachers out there that have their own Linux software to talk about?

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Sparks’ Fedora Project Journal by Eric H Christensen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

QSL from TG9AHM

Received a nice surprise in the mail, today.  TG9AHM sent his card, a sticker of the Guatemala flag, and two smaller stickers showing the image from the front of the QSL card.  Very nice!  The stamps on the envelope were also a nice surprise and will immediately go into my collection.

Resolved my SSH key authentication problem.

A couple of days ago I blogged about a problem I was having with SSH not allowing me to do public key authentication after upgrading from F12 to F13.  At some point I had uncommented the line

AuthorizedKeysFile     .ssh/authorized_keys

It used to work but the latest version, in F13-Beta, does NOT like it.  I’m assuming that ~/.ssh/authorized_keys would work but commenting it out worked for me.

Creative Commons License
Sparks’ Fedora Project Journal by Eric H Christensen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

Anyone know how to speeding up ssh transfers?

I use rdiff-backup to backup various systems to my file server which then gets an offline backup.  I dropped a bunch of new files on one of the systems and I’m watching the backup (1.2 GB so far) creep across the 100MB/s connection at a crawling 1.7-2.0 MB/s.  Anyone know a way for me to utilize more of the 100MB/s connection?

Creative Commons License
Sparks’ Fedora Project Journal by Eric H Christensen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

DXCC Entities #100 and #101 confirmed!

Well, I finally received QSLs for DXCC entities 100 and 101!  HD2A sent his card for our 15m contact thus confirming Ecuador for number 100 and then YN2EA confirmed our contacts on 15m and 20m for Nicaragua and entity number 101.

It’s official, I now qualify for DXCC!  Woot!  Only 237 countries left!