Monthly Archives: July 2010

New CQRLOG installed.

I just installed the new CQRLOG on both my computers. I noted that in the release notes that a change was made to the main logging screen that allows netbook users to more easily use the program. I was very excited about this as I do run a small laptop (is it a netbook?) and I have had problems with this screen. Sure enough it works great! Now I just need to sync up my log from the big computer to the laptop.

DXCC!

I have submitted my application to the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) for my initial DXCC (http://www.arrl.org/dxcc) award. The plan is to present my cards for checking to the ARRL on 6 August. I'm quite excited as this has been a long-term goal of mine.

I think three-quarters of my countries were confirmed using the ARRL's Logbook of the World (http://www.arrl.org/logbook-of-the-world) which makes their confirmation extremely cheap.

After my cards have been processed I should have 102 countries confirmed.

git over email

Just a late night thought before I turn the light off, again, and go to sleep, again.

What if I only had e-mail access and wanted to work with a git repo.  Is there anything out there that would allow me to pull diffs or push diffs using nothing but an email message?

Hmmm…

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Sparks’ Fedora Project Journal by Eric H Christensen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

FiSH IRC Encryption

A few friends and I have been playing with IRC encryption courtesy of FiSH.  This extremely simple program is a plugin for irssi, XChat, and mIRC and provides symmetric encryption for channels and asymmetric encryption for private messages.

While not really useful for open source project communication it might be useful to someone out there wishing to keep their communications private.  I’ll put these on my list of something I might want to package.  Anyone else interested in this software?

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Sparks’ Fedora Project Journal by Eric H Christensen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

A better backup solution

When Fedora 13 hit the streets I was excited to see a new backup solution, Deja Dup, included in the distribution.  For the past several months I’ve been using my own version of a backup solution, namely rsync rdiff-backup, which always felt a little cobbled together.  But now I have a shiny new backup solution that will solve all of my problems, right?

Well, unfortunately I wish I could give Deja Dup better reviews.  Because Deja Dup is a shiny frontend for Duplicity I can’t really tell you which one I don’t like.  The biggest problem is that from day to day the system may backup appropriately or it may error out for no apparent reason.  When it does error out the information I receive to help troubleshoot the problem is less than helpful.  Most of the time it simply says that the program error is unknown.

It also takes quite a while to make regular, daily incremental backups.  With so little changing on the system daily there shouldn’t be much to backup but it still takes half an hour or longer to do so whereas my rsync would take 10 minutes on a bad day.

Deja Dup, and Duplicity by extension, have a really cool feature that rsync does not have, however.  Deja Dup provides the ability to use synchronous encryption on your backup.  If you use Duplicity you can use asynchronous encryption as well.  This is a great feature if you are doing off-site backups to a location that you don’t fully trust.  Unfortunately I never got that feature to work, either.

So I’m moving back to my trusty and faithful rsync rdiff-backup which also means a full backup today.  Hopefully Deja Dup will soon become that solution I’ve been dreaming about for so long.
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Sparks’ Fedora Project Journal by Eric H Christensen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

My first TWUUG meeting…

Not since my last TriLUG meeting, several years ago, had I attended any kind of LUG meeting.  Last night I decided to give my local UUG a go.

A friend of mind had told me about the Tidewater Unix User’s Group (TWUUG) a couple of years ago but I put it in the back of my head and didn’t think about it much.  Luckily for me I decided to go, last night, and see what the group is all about.  I’m not sure what I was expecting but what I found was good group of geeks that had assembled to learn more from one another.  While an informal presentation was given on a program named hardinfo others people in the group were helping provide answers to questions that went far further into computer engineering than I had expected to be asked.  But isn’t that what it’s all about?  You see something, want to know more about it, and then ask the question hoping the presenter will be able to answer the question.  But it doesn’t have to be the presenter or any single person that has to be able to answer that question because we are a community and we help each other.

So on my calendar on the first Thursday of the month will be TWUUG.  If you are down in the Norfolk area during that time you should stop by and say hi!

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Sparks’ Fedora Project Journal by Eric H Christensen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.