Category Archives: radio-programming

Updated Maryland DMR Codeplugs

I just updated my Mid-Atlantic (now called Maryland) codeplugs and have made them available on my Maryland DMR project page.  Right now the codeplugs only contain repeaters in Maryland but I will be working on them over the next few days to include Washington DC and Virginia repeaters that are nearby.

Codeplugs are available for the CS-700, CS-750, and CS-800.  Please let me know if you’re using them and if there are any errors I need to fix (I know of one already).

Linux, the Yaesu FT-1D, and the SCU-18

I had almost given up on programming my Yaesu FT-1D on my Linux computer.  The software provided by Yaesu wouldn’t work on Linux and CHIRP didn’t support the radio.  Well, CHIRP didn’t support it until now.  While it’s not official, their daily build claims to support the radio and that makes me excited.  But there’s still a problem.

The programming cable that is provided by Yaesu, the SCU-18, doesn’t seem to be recognized by my Linux system.  Well, it’s recognized but it doesn’t actually attach the device to a port so I can use it.

usb 3-1: new full-speed USB device number 12 using xhci_hcd
usb 3-1: New USB device found, idVendor=0584, idProduct=b03a
usb 3-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=0
usb 3-1: Product: USB-Serial Converter
usb 3-1: Manufacturer: RATOC Systems,Inc.

and

Bus 003 Device 013: ID 0584:b03a RATOC System, Inc.

It turns out, the device appears to be a RATOC System USB60MB.  What Yaesu is shipping looks just like these devices except for where the 9-pin serial connector is there is actually some proprietary USB plug.

I think this is the only part that is holding me back.  I’m hoping to talk with a few people tomorrow that can hopefully help remedy the problem.  I feel that I’m really close to a solution, though, and hope to make this process easier for other Linux users out there.

CHIRP – Open source programming of your amateur radio

Cross post with Sparks’ Linux blog.

A screenshot of CHIRP

CHIRP

In the past I’ve been frustrated by a lack of Linux-supported software for programming my amateur radios. Sure, the Kenwood software that they gave you to use would kinda work under Wine but it’s Wine and who wants to operate under that? Last year I discovered a project that aimed to solve my problem. CHIRP is an open source alternative to other pieces of software that allow you to program your radios. Supporting many of the current radio models, this software allows you to create your channel list and then use that on every radio you own.

Last year when I tried the software it wouldn’t program frequencies in the 70-cm band correctly. That bug has been fixed and many features added as well. There are even static lists of frequencies one might want to include on their radio including the FRS channels, 60m channels, NOAA weather radio channels, and others. The software even interfaces with online frequency repositories making it easy to program repeaters into your radio when you are traveling to a new area.

The software is available for Linux, Mac, and Windows and is currently available in the Fedora software repositories (sudo yum install chirp).